Technique Example

Here is an example of how we approach the teaching of our self-defense techniques. Obviously all of this is not thrown at you all at once. This level of understanding is developed in stages as you progress. You’ll find that you will learn HOW to execute self defense along with WHY you should execute it that way.

RETURNING SERPENT

NATURE OF THE ATTACK

  • The attacker is throwing a right straight or roundhouse punch at the defender’s head. The right leg is either coming forward or is already forward during the execution of the strike. Relative position will place the defender inside the attacker’s right arm.

NATURE OF THE DEFENSE

  • This technique teaches the ability to alternate levels of defense by employing a high-low-high sequence of striking. It also the first technique to teach Reactionary Anticipation where one strike will cause a body reaction that the next strike will take advantage of.

TECHNIQUE DESCRIPTION Stage 1

  • a) Step the left foot to 6 o’clock into a right neutral bow. This is to move away from the attacker establishing distance and establishing the base. b) Execute right inward block to contact below the elbow, creating a barrier between the strike and its intended target. c) Your left hand should be palm up resting at or slightly in front of your solar plexus. This positions the hand in a checking position and prepares it for the next strike.  d) Rake the radial nerve of the attacker with a frictional pull toward the wrist. Immediately loop your right hand into a right back knuckle to the attacker’s right temple or mastoid, striking the target on a trajectory forward and to the right. The “loop” should be executed as a flat oval allowing you to guideline directly up the attacker’s arm to the desired target.
  • Body Reaction – a) Deflecting the attacker’s punch (straight) or intercepting the punch’s path of travel (roundhouse) both will have a cancelling effect on the attacker’s width zone and possibly the depth zone as well before it reaches its desired target. b) The frictional pull along the radial nerve should cause the attacker’s lead shoulder and the head to be drawn forward. c) The back knuckle will ideally cause the attacker’s head to snap back at a 45-degree angle this should cause a rearward motion of the shoulders bringing forward and exposing the right lower rib area.

Stage 2

  • a) Pivot into a Right Lunge Stance. Fully pivoting into the forward facing stance will allow complete freedom of travel of the rear hand. b) Execute left lunge punch to right floating ribs c) Right fist positions at left shoulder.
  • Body Reaction – a) Striking the floating rib should result in the attacker collapsing forward over their right hip, bringing the head back into position for the final strike.

Stage 3

  • a) Pivot back into a Right Neutral Bow. This allows for counter-torque to be employed for the final strike. b) Execute second right back knuckle strike to the attacker’s right temple/mastoid. c) Left hand moves to a positional check of the high center torso to guard against an unintentional strike by the attackers right arm as the attackers body reacts to the defender’s strike.
  • Body Reaction – a) The final strike should cause the attacker’s head to violently snap back at a 45-degree angle. This action combined with the results of the first strike to the temple and the second strike to the ribs should cause the attacker to be unable to re-engage.
  • Execute a right front crossover and cover out.

PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS Stage 1

  • Frictional Pull
  • Guidelining
  • Fitting

Stage 2

  • Reverse Motion
  • Body Alignment

Stage 3

  • Reverse Motion
  • Guidelining
  • Fitting

COMMON MISTAKES Stage 1

  • Blocking too high on the arm. Blocking above the elbow will allow the attacker’s punch to circle around the blocking arm and strike. Blocking at the elbow may actually accelerate the attacker’s strike to the target.
  • Leaving the shoulders facing forward while blocking. This results from not fully settling into a proper neutral bow. This will not only affect stability of the stance but the effectiveness of the block as well.
  • Beginning the “looping” motion too soon. Complete the block first. The frictional pull begins from the point of contact of the block. This will also prevent the block from making contact past the optimum angle of efficiency.
  • Improper hand position of the back knuckle strike, striking with the flat of the back of the hand. The knuckles must be in the lead to ensure maximum penetration of the strike.

Stage 2

  • Not pivoting into the Lunge Stance. This separates the final two stages from the movement of the core and robs the rib strike of range and power and the final back knuckle strike of the counter torque necessary for power. The upper and lower carriages must work in unison.
  • Dropping the right hand to the right hip when executing the rib punch. This takes the right hand out of position for checking and the follow-up back knuckle.

Stage 3

  • Not pivoting back into the Neutral Bow. This eliminates the counter torque from the final strike, making the back knuckle an arm-only movement.
  • Improper hand position of the back knuckle strike, striking with the flat of the back of the hand. The knuckles must be in the lead to ensure maximum penetration of the strike.

TECHNIQUE ALTERNATIVES

  • Use open hand strikes on this technique. Use chops to the mastoid instead of back knuckles to the temple; use a horizontal heel palm to the ribs. This can be used to lower the Ladder of Force considerations should you desire.
  • On the final strike, use the left hand to contour the inside of the attacker’s right arm and grab the wrist. Using opposing forces simultaneously change the final back knuckle to a forward chop to the right side of the trachea.
  • After the final back knuckle, immediately sweep the attacker’s right foot with your right foot along it’s original line, significantly lengthening the attacker’s base additionally unbalancing them as you exit. This movement can also lead into a quick pivot to the left and execution of a left rear leg buckle accompanied by a left rear elbow to the centerline target of choice or left chop to the throat, depending on range.

© Triangle Kenpo Institute 2017